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Archive for the ‘unassisted childbirth’ Category

I finally finished compiling my list of parenting, pregnancy, etc. related books. So, I thought I would share the list with whomever reads my blog. Feel free to recommend additional books…I do love books

Those related to Natural Child Birth and Pregnancy (in no particular order):

  1. Aromatherapy During Your Pregnancy, Fances R. Cliffford
  2. Unassisted Homebirth, An Act of Love, Lynn M. Griesemer
  3. The Thinking Woman’s Guide to a Better Birth, Henci Goer
  4. Birth Over Thirty-Five, Sheila Kitzinger
  5. The Natural Childbirth Book, Joyce Milburn & Lynnette Smith
  6. A Good Birth, A Safe Birth, Diane Korte & Roberta Scaer
  7. The Birth Partner, Penny Simkin
  8. Unassisted Childbirth, Laura Kaplan Shanley
  9. Water Birth Unplugged,Proceedings of the First International Water Birth Conference, Edited by Beverley A. Lawrence Beech
  10. Pushed,, Jennifer Block
  11. Taking Charge of Your Fertility, Toni Weschler
  12. Birthing From Within, Pam England & Rob Horowitz
  13. Hypnobirthing: A Celebration of Life, Marie F. Mongan (2 copies)
  14. Hypnobirthing, Marie Mongan
  15. Heart & Hands, A Midwife’s Guide to Pregnancy & Birth, Elizabeth Davis
  16. Ina May’s Guide to Childbirrth, Ina May Gaskin
  17. Emergency Childbirth, A Manual, Gregory J. White
  18. Birthing From Within, Pam England & Rob Horowitz

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http://www.medicaln ewstoday. com/articles/ 98156.php

Avoiding Induced Labor Is More Beneficial To Moms And Babies

Throughout pregnancy, many women eagerly anticipate the day they finally
will meet their new baby. This is especially true in the last few weeks of
pregnancy when, as a baby grows larger, an expectant mother becomes
increasingly uncomfortable and impatient to finish out her pregnancy.
Despite the anticipation, research shows that allowing labor to start
naturally, rather than induce, is more beneficial to both mom and baby.

Labor induction, or artificially initiating labor through the use of
medicine, is performed for a variety of reasons. Today, one of the more
common reasons for induction is “convenience. ” Hospitals can staff extra
nurses, physicians can schedule births for times that are most convenient
for them, and expectant parents can make work and family arrangements in
advance according to their scheduled induction date.

At first glance, labor induction may seem more convenient; however, it’s
important to recognize that induction may lead to a longer labor and overall
hospital stay, more medical interventions, higher costs, risk of potential
for litigation, and adverse outcome for a mother or baby.

In the last weeks of pregnancy, a woman’s body and her baby perform crucial
functions to prepare for birth. The baby’s lungs mature and he or she
develops a protective layer of fat. In addition, the baby drops down into
the pelvis, the cervix tilts forward and softens, and irregular contractions
help the cervix thin and begin to dilate. In most cases, a woman’s body goes
into labor only when her body and her baby are ready.

“Research at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School suggests
that it is a signal from the baby that starts the process of labor,” says
Debby Amis, RN, BSN, CD(DONA), LCCE, FACCE. “The best way for a mother to
know that her baby is fully mature and ready to be born is to allow labor to
begin on its own.”

Lamaze International recommends
<http://www.lamaze. org/ChildbirthEd ucators/Resource sforEducators/ CarePracticePape rs/LaborBeginsOn ItsOwn/tabid/ 487/Default. aspx>that
a woman allows her body to go into labor on its own, unless there is a true
medical reason to induce. Allowing labor to start on its own reduces the
possibility of complications, including a vacuum or forceps-assisted birth,
fetal heart rate changes, babies with low birth weight or jaundice, and
cesarean surgery. Studies consistently show that inducing labor almost
doubles a woman’s chance of having cesarean surgery.

“By avoiding induction, women are less likely to encounter other medical
interventions, ” says Lamaze International President Allison J. Walsh, IBCLC,
LCCE, FACCE. “Experiencing natural contractions and laboring without
unnecessary medical interventions increases a woman’s freedom to respond to
contractions by moving and changing positions, both of which facilitate the
process of labor and birth.”

Avoiding induction also decreases the likelihood of a premature birth.
Because neither doctors nor mothers can determine a baby’s due date with 100
percent accuracy, babies may be induced accidentally before they reach full
term (at least 37 completed weeks). A scheduled induction at 39 weeks could
result in giving birth to a preterm baby who is only 36 weeks gestation.
Preterm babies miss critical stages of development that take place during
the last weeks of pregnancy and are at risk are for several postnatal
complications. A study published in *The Journal of the American Medical
Association* examined 4.5 million births in the United States and Canada and
concluded that babies born only a few weeks early-at 34 weeks through 36
weeks-were nearly 3 times more likely to die in their first year of life
than full-term infants.

When medically necessary, inducing labor can be a life saving procedure. The
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
<http://www.acog. org/>states
that labor may be induced if it is more risky for a woman’s baby to remain
inside her body than to be born.

Medical reasons for induction include, a woman’s water has broken and labor
has not begun for several hours; her pregnancy is post term (more than 42
weeks); she has pregnancy-induced high blood pressure; she has health
problems that could affect her baby, like diabetes; there is an infection in
her uterus; or her baby is growing too slowly.

First-time mothers are most vulnerable to the risks of inductions. Contrary
to what many believe, suspecting a large baby is not a medical reason for
induction. It is very difficult for a doctor or midwife to determine the
size of a woman’s baby before birth with accuracy, even with the use of
ultrasound. Studies consistently show that inducing for a suspected large
baby increases, rather than decreases, the incidence of cesarean birth.

Lamaze International has developed a care practice paper entitled “Labor
Begins on its Own,”
<http://www.lamaze. org/ChildbirthEd ucators/Resource sforEducators/ CarePracticePape rs/LaborBeginsOn ItsOwn/tabid/ 487/Default. aspx>which
presents the research surrounding labor induction and tips for avoiding
induced labor
<http://www.lamaze. org/ExpectantPar ents/Pregnancyan dBirthResources/ MoreTipsandTools /InductionTips/ tabid/255/ Default.aspx>.

Childbirth education classes, such as Lamaze, provide women with the tools
and information they need to make educated choices during labor and birth.
To find a Lamaze class in your area, visit http://www.lamaze. org.

*About Lamaze International *

Since its founding in 1960, Lamaze International has worked to promote,
support and protect normal birth through education and advocacy through the
dedicated efforts of professional childbirth educators, providers and
parents. An international organization with regional, state and area
affiliates, its members and volunteer leaders include childbirth educators,
nurses, midwives, doulas, lactation consultants, physicians, students and
consumers.

Lamaze International <http://www.lamaze. org/

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Apparently, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has seen The Business of Being Born. Because they have issues a News Release that is about as preposterous as anything I have ever read from a medical establishment.

Below is the News Release, but I have to simply point out that ACOG’s conclusions are not based on evidence.

Lets look at some of their statements.

First, “ACOG acknowledges a woman’s right to make informed decisions regarding her delivery and to have a choice in choosing her health care provider, but ACOG does not support programs that advocate for, or individuals who provide, home births.”

Informed decisions in a hospital are less and less likely as time goes by. Women are not being given a choice! I have read many studies on my risks of having a repeat C-section vs. having another VBAC (I had my VBAC 2 years ago after 2 c-sections). I have determined that many risks of having a repeat c-section are much greater than having a VBAC. However there are very few hospitals in the U.S. that truly support a VBAC. Many will say they support moms attempting a VBAC, but when it comes down to the time of delivery, many women are then pushed into a c-section due to “large baby” determination, or “you are overdue” or “you have been in labor too long…failure to progress” diagnosis. Some of these reasons may be justified in some cases, but in many, they are not. It is those women and babies who are threatened. Inducing a VBAC has become more common and unfortunately, often leads to a c-section also. Women have very little control of their labors while in hospitals which leads to more c-sections.

ACOG goes further to state “Childbirth decisions should not be dictated or influenced by what’s fashionable, trendy, or the latest cause célèbre.” Are they kidding us? How fashionable has it become to have an elective c-section? Give me a break!

I especially love this fear tactic: “Despite the rosy picture painted by home birth advocates, a seemingly normal labor and delivery can quickly become life-threatening for both the mother and baby. Attempting a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) at home is especially dangerous because if the uterus ruptures during labor, both the mother and baby face an emergency situation with potentially catastrophic consequences, including death. Unless a woman is in a hospital, an accredited freestanding birthing center, or a birthing center within a hospital complex, with physicians ready to intervene quickly if necessary, she puts herself and her baby’s health and life at unnecessary risk.” See the study below which shows that women are much safer and at less risk of a repeat c-section if attended by a midwife instead of an OB. This is all about money to ACOG. They have NO evidence to back this claim.

Lastly (because what they are saying exhausts me right now), ACOG states “Choosing to deliver a baby at home, however, is to place the process of giving birth over the goal of having a healthy baby”. *I* am certainly not putting the process of giving birth over the goal of having a healthy baby and a healthy mommy. Neither are many women that I know who chose birthing at home, even if alone, to birthng in a hospital because we know that the medical professionals will not be patient with us..they will not respect our decisions..they will simply fall into their routine of time schedules and management and look at us as another mom who is bettter off being induced or sectioned. I chose not to be among people like that when I birth this child.

ACOG NEWS RELEASE

ACOG Statement on Home Births Washington, DC — The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) reiterates its long-standing opposition to home births. While childbirth is a normal physiologic process that most women experience without problems, monitoring of both the woman and the fetus during labor and delivery in a hospital or accredited birthing center is essential because complications can arise with little or no warning even among women with low-risk pregnancies.

ACOG acknowledges a woman’s right to make informed decisions regarding her delivery and to have a choice in choosing her health care provider, but ACOG does not support programs that advocate for, or individuals who provide, home births. Nor does ACOG support the provision of care by midwives who are not certified by the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) or the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB).

Childbirth decisions should not be dictated or influenced by what’s fashionable, trendy, or the latest cause célèbre. Despite the rosy picture painted by home birth advocates, a seemingly normal labor and delivery can quickly become life-threatening for both the mother and baby. Attempting a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) at home is especially dangerous because if the uterus ruptures during labor, both the mother and baby face an emergency situation with potentially catastrophic consequences, including death. Unless a woman is in a hospital, an accredited freestanding birthing center, or a birthing center within a hospital complex, with physicians ready to intervene quickly if necessary, she puts herself and her baby’s health and life at unnecessary risk.

Advocates cite the high US cesarean rate as one justification for promoting home births. The cesarean delivery rate has concerned ACOG for the past several decades and ACOG remains committed to reducing it, but there is no scientific way to recommend an ‘ideal’ national cesarean rate as a target goal. In 2000, ACOG issued its Task Force Report Evaluation of Cesarean Delivery to assist physicians and institutions in assessing and reducing, if necessary, their cesarean delivery rates. Multiple factors are responsible for the current cesarean rate, but emerging contributors include maternal choice and the rising tide of high-risk pregnancies due to maternal age, overweight, obesity and diabetes.

The availability of an obstetrician-gynecologist to provide expertise and intervention in an emergency during labor and/or delivery may be life-saving for the mother or newborn and lower the likelihood of a bad outcome. ACOG believes that the safest setting for labor, delivery, and the immediate postpartum period is in the hospital, or a birthing center within a hospital complex, that meets the standards jointly outlined by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and ACOG, or in a freestanding birthing center that meets the standards of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, The Joint Commission, or the American Association of Birth Centers.

It should be emphasized that studies comparing the safety and outcome of births in hospitals with those occurring in other settings in the US are limited and have not been scientifically rigorous. Moreover, lay or other midwives attending to home births are unable to perform live-saving emergency cesarean deliveries and other surgical and medical procedures that would best safeguard the mother and child.

ACOG encourages all pregnant women to get prenatal care and to make a birth plan. The main goal should be a healthy and safe outcome for both mother and baby. Choosing to deliver a baby at home, however, is to place the process of giving birth over the goal of having a healthy baby. For women who choose a midwife to help deliver their baby, it is critical that they choose only ACNM-certified or AMCB-certified midwives that collaborate with a physician to deliver their baby in a hospital, hospital-based birthing center, or properly accredited freestanding birth center.

# # #

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is the national medical organization representing over 52,000 members who provide health care for women.

http://www.acog.org/from_home/publications/press_releases/nr02-06-08-2.cfm

 

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The Truth About VBAC

“As long as you are of legal age and able to think clearly, logically, and coherently for yourself, you should never cede that responsibility [to make your own health decisions] to anyone else – not your doctor, not your friends, not to your family, not to the heath gurus, and especially not the media.  Unlike many among the health police force, I believe that you are easily smart enough to evaluate the news.  You really have no choice.  People are finally realizing that they cannot trust the health industry machine anymore.  That means you must come to rational, intelligent decision based on the best that science has to offer”  – From Eat, Drink, & Be Merry by Dean Edell, MD

http://vbacfacts.com/vbac/#FFR

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http://www.greenjournal.org/cgi/content/full/108/1/12

of which there were some surprising results, this especially:

” In all adjusted models, multiple prior cesarean delivery was not associated with an increased risk for uterine rupture.  “

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As part of my plan to be as healthy as I can be during this pregnancy and birth, I have decided to commit to the Dr. Brewer’s Diet.  You can learn more here: http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/

Basically, this Dr. is convinced that diet has more to do with maternal and infant health than we are being led to believe.

here is an exerpt:

Toxemia. Pre-Eclampsia. HELLP Syndrome. Premature birth.
Low birth weight. Intrauterine growth retardation.

It’s not genetics. It’s not random. The cause is NOT unknown. Toxemia CAN be stopped. PreeclampsiaA-toxic-condition-developing-in-late-pre... CAN be stopped. Best of all, YOU can stop it!

HOW? All the scientific research being done on toxemia and preeclampsia these days is focusing on treatment, and none of it is promising. But the research has already been done, many times and many ways in the past 50+ years, and we know that you can PREVENT this from happening to you in the first place, no matter what your personal history may be. The simple answer? GOOD NUTRITION.

Common sense tells you to eat right when you’re pregnant, and traditional wisdom says you’re “eating for two“. So why are doctors telling you to cut out salt, avoid gaining too much weight, and giving you little or no information about what IS a good diet for pregnancy? Why is the medical community so disinterested in this information? As one doctor put it, “No one is going to make any money off good nutrition.”

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J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 May;52(5):310- 7. Midwifery care, social
and medical risk factors, and birth outcomes in the USA.

MacDorman MF, Singh GK. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine if there are significant differences in birth
outcomes and survival for infants delivered by certified nurse midwives
compared with those delivered by physicians, and whether these differences,
if they exist, remain after controlling for sociodemographic and medical
risk factors.

DESIGN: Logistic regression models were used to examine differences between
certified nurse midwife and physician delivered births in infant, neonatal,
and postneonatal mortality, and risk of low birthweight after controlling
for a variety of social and medical risk factors. Ordinary least squares
regression models were used to examine differences in mean birthweight after
controlling for the same risk factors.

STUDY SETTING: United States.

PATIENTS: The study included all singleton, vaginal births at 35-43 weeks
gestation delivered either by physicians or certified nurse midwives in the
United States in 1991.

MAIN RESULTS: After controlling for social and medical risk factors, the
risk of experiencing an infant death was 19% lower for certified nurse
midwife attended than for physician attended births, the risk of neonatal
mortality was 33% lower, and the risk of delivering a low birthweight infant
31% lower. Mean birthweight was 37 grams heavier for the certified nurse
midwife attended than for physician attended births.

CONCLUSIONS: National data support the findings of previous local studies
that certified nurse midwives have excellent birth outcomes. These findings
are discussed in light of differences between certified nurse midwives and
physicians in prenatal care and labour and delivery care practices.
Certified nurse midwives provide a safe and viable alternative to maternity
care in the United States, particularly for low to moderate risk women.

PMID: 9764282 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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